8.5 C
New York
Saturday, December 3, 2022

TCM's creepy Halloween programming has robots, ghosts and lots of Christopher Lee – Buffalo News

George A. Romero’s 1968 zombie film “Night of the Living Dead” continues to inspire horror filmmakers today. It is part of Halloween programming for Turner Classic Movies.
Turner Classic Movies celebrates all things dark and spooky with its annual October/Halloween programming including films showcasing the Star of the Month, “Robots”; Monday nights devoted to “Creepy Cinema”; days honoring such horror film luminaries as Tod Browning, Val Lewton and Christopher Lee; and two full days of nonstop horror to close out the month.
Here are a few highlights (all times are Eastern). The full schedule is online at tcm.com.
Star of the Month: Robots on Saturdays
Each Saturday night in October, the programming will focus on robots in a 10-film tribute that includes “The Day the Earth Stood Still” and ”Westworld” on Oct. 8; “THX 1138,” the feature film debut from George Lucas, and “RoboCop” on Oct. 15; “Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine,” with Vincent Price as the title character in the horror comedy, on Oct. 22; and Wes Craven’s “Deadly Friend” on Oct. 29.
“Creepy Cinema,” Monday nights
Host Ben Mankiewicz will introduce this series starting with three of classic cinema’s greatest actresses on Oct. 3 with Bette Davis in “Dead Ringer,” Joan Crawford in “Possessed” and Joan Fontaine in “The Devil’s Own.”
Oct. 10 showcases a quartet of “newer” films with John Carpenter’s atmospheric ghost yarn “The Fog” (1980) leading the way at 8 p.m., followed by the groundbreaking werewolf film “The Howling” (1981), David Cronenberg’s “The Brood” (1979) and George A. Romero’s legendary “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).
Oct. 24 includes four films focusing on the ladies: 13-year-old Jodie Foster is “The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane,” plus “Alice, Sweet Alice,” “The Haunting of Julia” and “Let’s Scare Jessica to Death.”
“I Walked with a Zombie,” produced by Val Lewton and directed by Jacques Tournier, is known for its stunning visuals.

Tod Browning/Val Lewton Day, Oct. 20
It’s a doubleheader tribute to two influential horror filmmakers. The day starts with five of director Tod Browning’s films: “The Thirteenth Chair,” “Freaks,” “Mark of the Vampire,” the very creepy “The Devil-Doll” and “Miracles for Sale.”
The tribute switches to producer and writer Val Lewton starting 1 p.m. with “The Leopard Man,” “Isle of the Dead,” “The Body Snatcher” and “The Ghost Ship” plus the great  documentary “Val Lewton The Man in the Shadows.” There’s more Lewton on Oct. 30 with two of his best known films, both directed by Jacques Tournier: “Cat People” and “I Walked with a Zombie.”
1960s sci-fi, Oct. 10
While science-fiction is not necessarily synonymous with horror, it does often have scary themes or elements like the Morlocks in “The Time Machine.” Other films being shown on Oct. 10 include “Five Million Years to Earth,” “Battle Beneath the Earth” and “The Illustrated Man.”
Christopher Lee’s many appearances as Dracula are featured on Oct. 25 and 31 on Turner Classic Movies.
Christopher Lee Day, Oct. 25
Dracula and Hammer Films are the two things you need for a proper tribute to Christopher Lee and TCM is giving viewers both. Four of six “Dracula” movies Lee made for Hammer Films will be shown starting at 9 a.m. with ”Dracula, Prince of Darkness” (1965), the film known for Lee not speaking a word (but he does hiss beautifully). Later comes “Dracula Has Risen from the Grave” at 2:15 p.m., “Taste the Blood of Dracula” at 4 p.m. and “The Satanic Rites of Dracula” at 5:45 p.m.
Clearly a day of Lee wasn’t enough – and rightfully so – as Lee’s films also are shown on Oct. 31 with more Dracula (“Horror of Dracula” and “Dracula A.D.”), plus “The Mummy,” “Curse of Frankenstein” and “The Devil Rides Out.”
TCM Underground
TCM Underground, the network’s late-night cult film showcase, is the focus of programming on Oct. 25 that also celebrates the recently released book “50 Must-See Films from the World of Classic Cult and Late-Night Cinema” by Millie De Chirico and Quatoyiah Murry. Also look for TCM Underground’s fun slate of horror doubleheaders throughout October including “Village of the Damned”/”Children of the Damned,” Oct. 9; “It’s Alive”/“It Lives Again,” Oct. 21; and “Alligator”/“Alligator II: The Mutation,” Oct. 28.
Get the recommendations on what’s streaming now, games you’ll love, TV news and more with our weekly Home Entertainment newsletter!
Gusto Editor
{{description}}
Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Simon reveals the worst movie he’s seen in at least 10 years.

The go-down-easy Disney+ Halloween sequel for families stars Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy. The original released 29 years ago. Find out: Why all the buzz?

One Disney film waited over six decades to continue its story, and a beloved Christmas movie went nearly three decades before its follow-up was released.

The three-screen theater was an independent art house for upscale and foreign films before the pandemic.

Beautifully directed by Olivia Wilde, the gothic drama Don’t Worry Darling never fails to hold interest. But when it gets to the end – an interesting end – it somehow feels unfulfilled.

Almost 30 years after the Sanderson sisters found their way into the hearts of millennial kids looking for some PG-rated Halloween content, they’re back in “Hocus Pocus 2,” which reunites Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy. The film, streaming on Disney+ Friday, pits them against three teenager girls in modern day Salem. In her review, AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr writes the film is exactly what it needs to be for an entertaining night in with the family and actually improves on the original, which was pretty mediocre, thanks to a strong supporting cast.

It’s a little surprising that it took 22 years for “Blonde” to become a film. (It will be here next week and will be available on Netflix Sept. 28.)

Criminal lovers going on the run have inspired movies since 1937. Here’s a look at the top 25 films about these thrilling couples.

When you make a list of the roles each of the Avengers plays, you don’t find many checking off the “comedian” box.
George A. Romero’s 1968 zombie film “Night of the Living Dead” continues to inspire horror filmmakers today. It is part of Halloween programming for Turner Classic Movies.
“I Walked with a Zombie,” produced by Val Lewton and directed by Jacques Tournier, is known for its stunning visuals.
Christopher Lee’s many appearances as Dracula are featured on Oct. 25 and 31 on Turner Classic Movies.
Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

source

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest Articles